Category Archives: Water

General Water

Cadiz Water Project: Conservation and Sustainable Management of Desert Groundwater

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By Courtney Degener, Vice President, Communications & Investor Relations

A Part of the Cadiz Team for over 12 years.

Over the last two decades, California has grappled with systemic challenges to its traditional water supplies. Climat­ic extremes and more regular dry years are the new normal. The availability of reliable water to meet all of the state’s demands is a persistent public policy is­sue. We need water for our people, our environment and to sustain our way of life. In recognition of this need, in 2009 Cadiz Inc. set the objective of creating, designing, permitting and constructing an environmentally benign water proj­ect, and today we are nearing comple­tion of these objectives.

Cadiz Inc. is the largest private land­owner in the eastern Mojave Desert, where billions of gallons of water evaporate every year from the highly-saline Bristol and Cadiz dry lakes near the town of Amboy.… Read the full article

General Water

Upper Narrows Emergency Pipeline Project was Unlike Any Other

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VVWRA

By Logan Olds General Manager, Victor Valley Wastewater Reclamation Authority

It’s safe to say that the Upper Narrows Emergency Pipeline project was unlike any other for the Vic­tor Valley Wastewa­ter Reclamation Authority.

When a series of powerful storms in late 2010 broke open a large sewer line, spilling 42 million gallons of sewage into the Mojave River, the stage was set for one of the largest and most important recent FEMA projects in California.

Over the next five years, planners, engineers and construction teams navigated complex technical and en­vironmental obstacles – first in lay­ing nearly 5,000 feet of temporary pipe, then designing and building a permanent solution that included tunneling under the streets of Old Town Victorville and under 270 feet of rock through an earthquake fault.… Read the full article

General Water

Cadiz Inc Continues Work to Provide California Much-Needed New Water

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By Courtney Degener, Vice President, Communications & Investor Relations A part of the Cadiz team for over 12 years

The Mojave Desert’s Cadiz Valley in eastern San Bernardino County, Cali­fornia, is a hot, dry place. The sandy soil supports only sparse, low brush well adapted to the hot dry climate where summer temperatures reach up to 120 degrees. It’s just about the last place you’d go looking for water.

But in the 1980s, our Company found­ers did just that. Guided by early NASA satellite imagery, they postulated that the unique geology of the Cadiz Val­ley, which is about the size of Rhode Island, could indicate that groundwater had been collecting under the soil for millennia. We purchased land, drilled exploratory wells and, indeed, found plentiful, high-quality groundwater.… Read the full article

General Water

MWA Offers Assistance to Small Water Providers

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By Yvonne Hester, Community Liaison Officer

As California continues to experience year five of a statewide drought, hopes of a saving El Niño continue to elude the Golden State. Here in the High Des­ert, periods of drought are part of the na­tive climate, requiring the Mojave Wa­ter Agency to continually monitor and invest in plans and programs to ensure water for today and tomorrow. Among the Agency’s newest programs is the Small Systems Assistance Program (SSAP) that has been named as a finalist for an award of excellence from the As­sociation of California Water Agencies.

During the past two decades, MWA in­vested heavily in large capital projects such as pipelines and recharge facilities, but today the focus is on optimization of resources, thanks to community in­put during the 2014 Integrated Regional Water Management Plan.… Read the full article

General Water

Victor Valley Wastewater Reclamation Authority’s Apple Valley and Hesperia Subregional Reclamation Plants Scheduled for Completion in Early 2017

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Victor Valley Wastewater Reclama­tion Authority is so much more than a wastewater treatment plant. VVWRA is more like a resource recovery facil­ity that protects public health by taking the incoming waste and transforming it into something useful. With the help of nearly $200 million in capital proj­ects, funded in part by more than $71 million in grants, along with forward thinking planning and management, VVWRA creates millions of gallons per day of clean recycled water, gener­ates sustainable green energy and pro­duces high nutrient bio-solids that are used for land application. But it wasn’t always like this. In the last ten years, VVWRA has gone from a facility that was essentially dead and facing mul­tiple water quality violations, to a plant that is recognized as a leader in both the renewable energy and wastewater industries.… Read the full article

General Water

Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board’s Stormwater Program

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By Patty Z. Kouyoumdjian, Executive Officer

The Lahontan Regional Water Qual­ity Control Board, known as the La­hontan Water Board, is a state agency whose mission is to protect surface and groundwater uses for current and future benefit of all Californians. The board has seven members appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Senate. Staff offices are located in South Lake Tahoe and Victorville.

Implementing a number of federal and state regulatory programs, board decisions directly or indirectly affect most all residents within the Lahon­tan Region. The Lahontan Region encompasses the Great Basin portion of California. It extends from Ore­gon south to the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains and eastward from the crest of the Sierra Nevadas to Nevada. Within San Bernardino County, numerous board actions are taken to protect and improve the state’s waters.… Read the full article

General Water

Science: a Key to Water Management

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By Mojave Water Agency

California’s ongoing drought is just one factor in a complex equation of a changing water environment. With new state groundwater regulations, as well as stricter conservation measures, developing innovative and cost-effective solutions will require more than funding. It will require solid science data that will create greater consensus to develop long-term solutions.

The Mojave Water Agency’s second annual Water Summit turns the focus on “Science: The Key to Managing Water in a Changing World.” The event will be held April 8 from 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn in Victorville. The event is sponsored by the Mojave Water Agency and the Victor Valley Chamber of Commerce.

The half-day program will feature the Governor’s top groundwater leader, Gordon Burns, Undersecretary for the California Environmental Protection Agency.… Read the full article

General Water

MWA Groundwater Recharge Strategies and Other Programs Ensure Sustainability During Statewide Drought

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By Yvonne Hester
Community Liaison Officer
Mojave Water Agency

Headlines across the state showcase California’s water woes affecting farms, fish and wildlife, businesses, and residents. The Mojave Desert region, however, is weathering the drought thanks to Mojave Water Agency’s (MWA) capital investments and programs that replenish groundwater supplies, and encourage water conservation. These efforts have helped to “drought-proof” the region and will ensure sustainability without any imported water for the next three years or more.

Guiding MWA is a foundation of collaborative, integrated planning that embraces sound investment, science-based policies and programs, aggressive conservation efforts, and strategic basin recharge using surplus State Water Project water.

The first Integrated Regional Water Management plan, adopted in 2004, helped to more efficiently use the region’s geology, infrastructure, and collective financial resources.… Read the full article

General Water

High Desert Communities Focus on Water Projects and Program with an Eye to the Future

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By Yvonne Hester
Community Liaison Officer
Mojave Water Agency

A new spirit of cooperation among the High Desert communities, evidenced in recent joint marketing efforts, bodes well for planning water projects and programs for the Mojave Desert. An update of the 2004 Mojave Integrated Regional Water Management (MIR­WM) Plan is underway, and offers communities new opportunities to plan for water needs.

Leading this effort is the Regional Wa­ter Management Group comprised of the Mojave Water Agency (MWA), Victor Valley Wastewater Reclama­tion Authority, Mojave Desert Re­source Conservation District, Morongo Baseline Pipeline Commission, and the Technical Advisory Committee to MWA.

The planning process is a collaborative, stakeholder-driven effort to manage all aspects of water resources in the region and set a vision for the next 10-plus years of water management in the High Desert.… Read the full article

General Water

Mojave Water Agency is Ahead of the Curve in Reliable Fiscal and Program Policies

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By Tamara Alaniz
Mojave Water Agency

Responsible water management policies require sensible and transparent fiscal management processes. Securing water rights, building delivery infrastructure, and maintaining intricate systems of pipelines, pumps and pressure valves are all long-term projects requiring long-term capital funding procurement and coalition-building to secure a stable and sustainable supply of high quality water for the High Desert.

The Mojave Water Agency Board and staff work year-round to be forward-thinking, anticipating trends in policies affecting both water and economics. Combined with a conservative fiscal approach, the timing of MWA Board decisions has resulted in many science-based solutions to critical issues before they affect the region. This approach has suited our stakeholders well by positioning the agency to develop and fund regionally-appropriate policies and programs, both in preparation for leaner property tax revenues and anticipation of state/ federal government requirements.… Read the full article

General Water

Will a Big Quake Leave our Water Supplies “High and Dry?”

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By Art Bishop, President, Mojave Water Agency Board of Directors

[The following excerpts are from a February 22, 2012 article by Aaron Task of The Daily Ticker] “…The Strait of Hormuz is a waterway that connects the Persian Gulf to the Arabian Sea. It is the only passage to the open ocean for some of the biggest oil producers in the Middle East…

…Because so much of the world’s oil travels through the Strait, any disruption to the shipping channel would have a major impact on global crude oil prices, which ultimately determine the price we pay for gas at the pump.

Some analysts estimate the price of oil could go up by 50% within days if there’s a disruption of supply, which would mean much higher prices for us filling our tanks at the gas station — and anything else that requires the use of oil.Read the full article

General Water

Preparing for the Next Drought and Beyond

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By Michael Stevens
Community Liaison Officer

There’s a saying that goes: “No one plans to fail, but many fail to plan.” This adage, however, cannot apply to Mojave Water Agency (MWA) and most water agencies in the High Desert as we work to provide water for a region totaling 437,357 people-and expected to increase 60% by 2035 to 706,388.

The adage can’t apply because in 1983, the State of California adopted the Urban Water Management Planning Act, which requires water agencies to prepare an Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) every five years when a water agency’s service area includes at least 3,000 connections or water deliveries are equal to or greater than 3,000 acre-feet per year.

Despite better-than-average precipitation levels this past winter and this spring-and the recent cancellation of a three-year statewide drought-the state’s water resources are still subject to increasing demand for a finite supply.… Read the full article

General Water

Taking the Waste Out of Wastewater

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By Ryan Orr
Victor Valley Wastewater Reclamation Authority

Many High Desert residents don’t realize that the water they’re using to irrigate their gardens and lawns, and that municipalities use to irrigate parks, schools and golf courses, is perfectly safe for drinking.

At the Victor Valley Wastewater Reclamation Authority, we believe this precious resource should be conserved for just drinking and other uses that will sustain our water resources. The agency is introducing two new facilities, that when built out, will provide more than four million gallons of treated, reclaimed water to irrigate nearby parks and golf courses.

This much-needed benefit will not only help conserve water in our drought-ridden region but also create extra capacity in VVWRA’s currently crowded sewer pipe system, allowing for continued responsible growth and making way for new businesses to come to the Victor Valley.… Read the full article

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